Data Quality and Interenterprise Data Sharing

When working with data quality improvement there are three kinds of data to consider:

First-party data is the data that is born and managed internally within the enterprise. This data has traditionally been in focus of data quality methodologies and tools with the aim of ensuring that data is fit for the purpose of use and correctly reflects the real-world entity that the data is describing.  

Third-party data is data sourced from external providers who offers a set of data that can be utilized by many enterprises. Examples a location directories, business directories as the Dun & Bradtstreet Worldbase and public national directories and product data pools as for example the Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN).

Enriching first-party data with third-party is a mean to ensure namely better data completeness, better data consistency, and better data uniqueness.

Second-party data is data sourced directly from a business partner. Examples are supplier self-registration, customer self-registration and inbound product data syndication. Exchange of this data is also called interenterprise data sharing.

The advantage of using second-party in a data quality perspective is that you are closer to the source, which all things equal will mean that data better and more accurately reflects the real-world entity that the data is describing.

In addition to that, you will also, compared to third-party data, have the opportunity to operate with data that exactly fits your operating model and make you unique compared to your competitors.

Finally, second-party data obtained through interenterprise data sharing, will reduce the costs of capturing data compared to first-party data, where else the ever-increasing demand for more elaborate high-quality data in the age of digital transformation will overwhelm your organization.    

The Balancing Act

Getting the most optimal data quality with the least effort is about balancing the use of internal and external data, where you can exploit interenterprise data sharing through combining second-party and third-party data in the way that makes most sense for your organization.

As always, I am ready to discus your challenge. You can book a short online session for that here.

Direct Customers and Indirect Customers

When working with Master Data Management (MDM) for the customer master data domain one of the core aspects to be aware of is the union, intersection and difference between direct customers and indirect customers.

Direct customers are basically those customers that your organization invoice.

Indirect customers are those customers that buy your organizations products and services from a reseller (or marketplace). In that case the reseller is a direct customer to your organization.

The stretch from your organization via a reseller organization to a consumer is referred to as Business-to-Business-to-Consumer (B2B2C). This topic is told about in the post B2B2C in Data Management. If the end user of the product or service is another organization the stretch is referred to as Business-to-Business-to-Business (B2B2B).

The short stretch from your organization to a consumer is referred to as Direct-to-Consumer (D2C).

It does happen, that someone is both a direct customer and an indirect customer either over time and/or over various business scenarios.

IT Systems Involved

If we look at the typical IT systems involved here direct customers are managed in an ERP system where the invoicing takes place as part of the order-to-cash (O2C) main business process. Products and services sold through resellers are part of an order-to-cash process where the reseller place an order to you when their stock is low and pays you according to the contract between them and you. In ERP lingo, someone who pays you has an account receivable.

Typically, you will also handle the relationship and engagement with a direct customer in a CRM system. However, there are often direct customers where the relationship is purely administrative with no one from the salesforce involved. Therefore, these kinds of customers are sometimes not in the CRM system. They are purely an account receivable.

More and more organizations want to have a relationship with and engage with the end customer. Therefore, these indirect customers are managed in the CRM system as well typically where the salesforce is involved and increasingly also where digital sales services are applied. However, most often there will be some indirect customers not encompassed by the CRM system.

The Role of Master Data Management (MDM) in the context of customer master data is to be the single source for all customer data. So, MDM holds the union of customer master data from the ERP world and the CRM world.

An MDM platform also has the capability of encompassing other sources both internal ones and external ones. When utilized optimally, an MDM platform will be able to paint a picture of the entire space of where your direct customers and indirect customers are.

Business Opportunities

Having this picture is of course only interesting if you can use it to obtain business value. Some of the opportunities I have stumbled upon are:

  • More targeted product and service development by having more insight into the whole costumer space leading to growth advancements
  • Optimized orchestration of supply chain activities by having complete insight into the whole costumer space and thereby fostering cost savings
  • Improved ability to analyse the consequences of market change and changes in the economic environment in geographies and industries covered leading to better risk management.

Which business opportunities do you see arise for your organization by having a complete overview of the union, intersection and difference between your direct customers and indirect consumers?

Watch Out for Interenterprise MDM

In the recent Gartner Magic Quadrant for Master Data Management Solutions there is a bold statement:

By 2023, organizations with shared ontology, semantics, governance and stewardship processes to enable interenterprise data sharing will outperform those that don’t.

The interenterprise data sharing theme was covered a couple of years ago here on the blog in the post What is Interenterprise Data Sharing?

Interenterprise data sharing must be leveraged through interenterprise MDM, where master data are shared between many companies as for example in supply chains. The evolution of interenterprise MDM and the current state of the discipline was touched in the post MDM Terms In and Out of The Gartner 2020 Hype Cycle.

In the 00’s the evolution of Master Data Management (MDM) started with single domain / departmental solutions dominated by Customer Data Integration (CDI) and Product Information Management (PIM) implementations. These solutions were in best cases underpinned by third party data sources as business directories as for example the Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) world base and second party product information sources as for example the GS1 Global Data Syndication Network (GDSN).

In the previous decade multidomain MDM with enterprise-wide coverage became the norm. Here the solution typically encompasses customer-, vendor/supplier-, product- and asset master data. Increasingly GDSN is supplemented by other forms of Product Data Syndication (PDS). Third party and second party sources are delivered in the form of Data as a Service that comes with each MDM solution.

In this decade we will see the rise of interenterprise MDM where the solutions to some extend become business ecosystem wide, meaning that you will increasingly share master data and possibly the MDM solutions with your business partners – or else you will fade in the wake of the overwhelming data load you will have to handle yourself.

So, watch out for not applying interenterprise MDM.

PS: That goes for MDM end user organizations and MDM platform vendors as well.

What is Contextual MDM?

The term “contextual Master Data Management” has been floating around in a couple of years as for example when tool vendors want to emphasize on a speciality that they are very good at. One example is from the Data Quality Management leader Precisely in the August 2020 article with the title How Contextual MDM Drives True Results in the Age of Data Democratization. Another example is from the Product Information/Experience Management leader Contentserv in the 2017 article with the title Contentserv Expands its Portfolio with Innovative Contextual MDM.

We can see contextual MDM as smaller pieces of MDM with a given flavour as for example focussing on sub/overlapping disciplines as:

The focus can also be at:

  • A given locality
  • A given master data domain as customer, supplier, employee, other/all party, product (beyond PIM), location or asset
  • A given business unit

You must eat an elephant one bite at a time. Therefore, contextual MDM makes a good concept for getting achievable wins.   

However, in an organization with high level of data management maturity the range of contextual MDM use cases, and the solutions for them, will be encompassed by a common enterprise-wide, global, multidomain MDM framework – either as one solution or a well-orchestrated set of solutions.

One example with dependencies is when working with personalization as part of Product Experience Management (PXM). Here you need customer personas. The elephant in the room, so to speak, is that you have to get the actual personas from Customer MDM and/or the Customer Data Platform (CDP).

In having that common MDM solution/framework there are some challenges to be solved in order to cater for all the contextual MDM use cases. One such challenge, being context-aware customer views, was touched upon in the post There is No Single Customer 360 View.

How to Use Connected Master Data to Enable New Revenue Models

In today’s experience economy and in the age of digital transformation, there are two distinct ways you can use modern master data management to drive positive business outcomes:

  • Automating existing business processing so you can increase operational effectiveness, cut costs, reduce risk and drive incremental growth.
  • Developing new data-driven revenue streams that result in new substantial growth opportunities.

As customer centricity is vital to any digitisation project, so it must follow that improving the customer experience (CX) is a key objective of any digital transformation project.

Getting a comprehensive 360-degree view of customers in digital business processes involves the ability to connect customer master data with other master data entities, hierarchies, transactions, big data, and reference data.

As the diagram above shows, a connected and extended master data landscape (aka data hub) will give you the essential capabilities you need in order to understand your customers. Knowing your customers better allows you to develop better products, drive new streams of revenue, and deliver the best customer experience through hyper-personalization.    

Learn more in the white paper co-authored by Reltio and yours truly: Taking Customer 360 to The Next Level: Fueling New Digital Business

Organizations can deliver more value when they collaborate in sharing data externally

The saying in the title of this blog post is taken from a recent Gartner article with the tile Data Sharing Is a Business Necessity to Accelerate Digital Business.

In this article authored by Laurence Goasduff a key takeaway is that:

‘By 2023, organizations that promote data sharing will outperform their peers on most business value metrics”.

Regular readers of this blog will know that many good data things come from data sharing as for example pondered in the 11 years old post called Sharing data is key to a single version of the truth.

A consequence of the business benefits in sharing data will be a rise in data management disciplines aiming at business ecosystem wide data sharing, where product data syndication is an obvious opportunity.

During the last years I have been working on such a solution. This one is called Product Data Lake.

30% Network Economy and MDM

McKinsey Digital Network Economy and Digital Ecosystem

McKinsey Digital recently published an article with the title How do companies create value from digital ecosystems?

In here it is said that: “The integrated network economy could represent a global revenue pool of $60 trillion in 2025 with a potential increase in total economy share from about 1 to 2 percent today to approximately 30 percent by 2025”.

This dramatic shift will in my eyes mean a change of direction in the way we see Master Data Management (MDM) as well as Product Information Management (PIM) and Data Quality Management (DQM) solutions.

360 is a magic number in the master data and data quality world. It is about having a 360-degree view of customers, suppliers, and products. This is an inside-out view. The enterprise is looking at a world revolving around the enterprise just as back then when we thought the universe revolved around the planet Earth.

By 2025 forward looking enterprises must have changed that view and directed master data, product information and data quality management into a state fit for the network economy by having a business ecosystem wide MDM (PIM and DQM) solution landscape.

Gartner, the analyst firm, coins this Multienterprise MDM.

Data Marketplaces, Exchanges and Multienterprise MDM

In the recent Gartner Top 10 Trends in Data and Analytics for 2020 trend number 8 is about data marketplaces and exchanges. As stated by Gartner: “By 2022, 35% of large organizations will be either sellers or buyers of data via formal online data marketplaces, up from 25% in 2020.”

The topic of selling and buying data was touched here on the blog in the post Three Flavors of Data Monetization

A close topic to data marketplaces and exchanges is Multienterprise MDM.

In the 00’s the evolution of Master Data Management (MDM) started with single domain / departmental solutions dominated by Customer Data Integration (CDI) and Product Information Management (PIM) implementations. These solutions were in best cases underpinned by third party data sources as business directories as for example the Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) world base and second party product information sources as for example the GS1 Global Data Syndication Network (GDSN).

In the previous decade multidomain MDM with enterprise wide coverage became the norm. Here the solution typically encompasses customer-, vendor/supplier-, product- and asset master data. Increasingly GDSN is supplemented by other forms of Product Data Syndication (PDS). Third party and second party sources are delivered in the form of Data as a Service that comes with each MDM solution.

Data Marketplaces and Exchange

In this decade we will see the rise of multienterprise MDM where the solutions to some extend become business ecosystem wide, meaning that you will increasingly share master data and possibly the MDM solutions with your business partners – or else you will fade in the wake of the overwhelming data load you will have to handle yourself.

The data sharing will be facilitated by data marketplaces and exchanges.

On July 23rd I will, as a representative of The Disruptive MDM/PIM/DQM List, present in the webinar How to Sustain Digital Ecosystems with Multi-Enterprise MDM. The webinar is brought to you by Winshuttle / Enterworks. It is a part of their everything MDM & PIM virtual conference. Get the details and make your free registration here.

B2B2C in Data Management

The Business-to-Business-to-Consumer (B2B2C) scenario is increasingly important in Master Data Management (MDM), Product Information Management (PIM) and Data Quality Management (DQM).

This scenario is usually seen in manufacturing including pharmaceuticals as examined in the post Six MDMographic Stereotypes.

One challenge here is how to extend the capabilities in MDM / PIM / DQM solutions that are build for Business-to-Business (B2B) and Business-to-Consumer (B2C) use cases. Doing B2B2C requires a Multidomain MDM approach with solid PIM and DQM elements either as one solution, a suite of solutions or as a wisely assembled set of best-of-breed solutions.B2B2C MDM PIM DQMIn the MDM sphere a key challenge with B2B2C is that you probably must encompass more surrounding applications and ensure a 360-degree view of party, location and product entities as they have varying roles with varying purposes at varying times tracked by these applications. You will also need to cover a broader range of data types that goes beyond what is traditionally seen as master data.

In DQM you need data matching capabilities that can identify and compare both real-world persons, organizations and the grey zone of persons in professional roles. You need DQM of a deep hierarchy of location data and you need to profile product data completeness for both professional use cases and consumer use cases.

In PIM the content must be suitable for both the professional audience and the end consumers. The issues in achieving this stretch over having a flexible in-house PIM solution and a comprehensive outbound Product Data Syndication (PDS) setup.

As the middle B in B2B2C supply chains you must have a strategic partnership with your suppliers/vendors with a comprehensive inbound Product Data Syndication (PDS) setup and increasingly also a framework for sharing customer master data taking into account the privacy and confidentiality aspects of this.

This emerging MDM / PIM / DQM scope is also referred to as Multienterprise MDM.