IoT and Multi-Domain MDM

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is a hot topic and many Master Data Management (MDM) practitioners as well as tool and service vendors are exploring what the rise of the Internet-of-Things and the related Industry 4.0 themes will mean for Master Data Management in the years to come.

globalIn my eyes, connecting these smart devices and exploiting the big data you can pull (or being pushed) from them will require a lot for all Master Data Management domains. Some main considerations will be:

  • Party Master Data Management is needed to know about the many roles you can apply to a given device. Who is the manufacturer, vendor, supplier, owner, maintainer and collector of data? Privacy and security matters on that basis will have to be taken very seriously.
  • Location Master Data Management is necessary at a much deeper and precise level than what we are used to when dealing with postal addresses. You will need to know a home location with a timespan and you will need to confirm and, for moving devices, supplement with observed locations with a timestamp.
  • Product and Asset Master Data Management is imperative in order to know about the product model of the smart device and individual characteristics of the given device.

It is also interesting to consider, if you will be able to manage this connectivity within a MDM platform (even multidomain and end-to-end) behind your corporate walls. I do not think so as told in the post The Intersections of 360 Degree MDM.

I am afraid that Gartner does not help

“The average financial impact of poor data quality on organizations is $9.7 million per year.” This is a quote from Gartner, the analyst firm, used by them to promote their services in building a business case for data quality.

AverageWhile this quote rightfully emphasizes on that a lot of money is at stake, the quote itself holds a full load of data and information quality issues.

On the pedantic side, the use of the $ sign in international communication is problematic. The $ sign represents a lot of different currencies as CAD, AUD, HKD and of course also USD.

Then it is unclear on what basis this average is measured. Is it among the +200 million organizations in the Dun & Bradstreet Worldbase? Is it among organizations on a certain fortune list? In what year?

Even if you knew that this is an average in a given year for the likes of your organization, such an average would not help you justify allocation of resources for a data quality improvement quest in your organization.

I know the methodology provided by Gartner actually is designed to help you with specific return on investment for your organization. I also know from being involved in several business cases for data quality (as well as Master Data Management and data governance) that accurately stating how any one element of your data may affect your business is fiendishly difficult.

I am afraid that there is no magic around as told in the post Miracle Food for Thought.

How to exchange product information with trading partners?

In the era of digitalization, you need to exchange product information with your trading partners in an agile and automated way. At Product Data Lake we are determined to offer a world class service for that. But what exactly are your needs?

PDL How it worksWhether you are a company participating in a cross company supply chain or you help your clients in doing that, you can help us to help you by taking this survey.

Thanks a lot in advance.

The Pros and Cons of Master Data (Management)

As a comment on my LinkedIn status about my previous post Jan van Til asks:

Wouldn’t the world be far better of without the concept of master data? What problems are solved by it? What problems are introduced by it? The balance? So … why do we keep toiling with master data?”

What problems are solved?

A common definition of data quality is that data are fit for the intended purpose of use. However, with master data we have multiple purposes of use of these core data entities. In an enterprise architecture with no focus on master data, the same real world construct will be described in many different databases in many different ways.

This causes a myriad of challenges. There are no one face to our customers, which makes us look stupid. We may offer the same product unintentionally with different prices and with different features, which is stupid. Our reporting, business intelligence, data science will be based on ambiguous data and therefore potentially cause stupid decisions.

If we have data quality issues with no centralized management of master data we will fund data cleansing and prevention initiatives many times for the same real world construct – and probably with varying outcome. In a centralized master data management set up, we can avoid reinventing the wheel as explained in the post The Database versus the Hub.

What problems are introduced?

Implementing Master Data Management (MDM) is not without tears. This involves the whole enterprise, and will increasingly caused by the rise of digitalization involve the business ecosystem as well. You will have to spend money and resources, which are not always easily justified.

MDM is a complex discipline involving many stakeholders. There is a high risk of running over budget and time and missing the goals.

As MDM is the remedy against data silos, you may end up with MDM as just another data silo within your enterprise. And still, your MDM hub may be a data silo in your business ecosystem.

The balance

Think big, start small. Make it agile. A good example of an agile approach to MDM is proposed by the MDM vendor Semarchy as described here on What is Evolutionary MDM™?

While you need a strong inner hub for master data in your enterprise, do not try to impose that hub on everything and everyone as for example examined in the post A Different End-to-End Solution for Product Information Management (PIM).

Multi-Side MDM

What is a Master Data Entity?

What is a customer? What is a product? You encounter these common questions when working with Master Data Management (MDM).

The overall question about what master data is has been discussed on this blog often as for example in the post A Master Data Mind Map.

Master Data

The two common questions posed as start of this blog post is said to be very dangerous. Well, here are my experiences and opinions:

What is a customer?

In my eyes, customer is a role you can assign to a party. Therefore, the party is the real master data entity. A party can have many other roles as employee, supplier and other kinds of business partner roles. More times than you usually imagine, the party can have several roles at the same time. Examples are customers also being employees and suppliers who are also customers.

From a data quality point of view, it does not have to matter if a party is a customer or not at a certain time. If your business rules requires you to register that party because the party has placed an order, got an invoice, paid an invoice or pre-paid an amount, you will need to take care of the quality of the information you have stored. You will also have to care about the privacy, not at least if the party is a natural person.

Uniqueness is the most frequent data quality issue when it comes to party master data. Again, it is essential to detect or better prevent if the same party is registered twice or more whether that party is a customer according to someone’s definition or not.

What is a product?

Also with products business rules dictates if you are going to register that product. If you are a reseller of products, you should register a product that you promote (being in your range). You could register a product, that you resell that product occasionally (sometimes called specials). If you are a manufacturer, you should register your finished products, your semi-finished products and the used raw materials. Most companies are actually both a reseller and a manufacturer in some degree. Despite of that degree practically all companies also deals with indirect goods as spare parts, office supplies and other stuff you could register as a product within your organisation in the same way your supplier probably have.

What we usually defines as a product is most often what rather should be called a product model. That means we register information about things that are made in the same way and up by the same ingredients and branded similarly. A thing, as each physical instance of a product model, will increasingly have business rules that requires it to be registered as told in the post Adding Things to Product Data Lake.

Big Data Fitness

A man with one watch knows what time it is, but a man with two watches is never quite sure. This old saying could be modernized to, that a person with one smart device knows the truth, but a person with two smart devices is never quite sure.

An example from my own life is measuring my daily steps in order to motivate me to be more fit. Currently I have two data streams coming in. One is managed by the app Google Fit and one is managed by the app S Health (from Samsung).

This morning a same time shot looked like this:

Google Fit:

google-fit

S Health:

s-health

So, how many steps did I take this morning? 2,047 or 2413?

The steps are presented on the same device. A smartphone. They are though measured on two different devices. Google Fit data are measured on the smartphone itself while S Health data are measured on a connected smartwatch. Therefore, I might not be wearing these devices in the exact same way. For example, I am the kind of Luddite that do not bring the phone to the loo.

With the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the expected intensive use of the big data streams coming from all kinds of smart devices, we will face heaps of similar cases, where we have two or more sets of data telling the same story in a different way.

A key to utilize these data in the best fit way is to understand from what and where these data comes. Knowing that is achieved through modern Master Data Management (MDM).

At Product Data Lake we in all humbleness are supporting that by sharing data about the product models for smart devices and in the future by sharing data about each device as told in the post Adding Things to Product Data Lake.

The Rise of Business Ecosystems in Data Management

There are many signs showing that we are entering the age of business ecosystems. A recent example is an article from Digital McKinsey. This read worthy article is called Adopting an ecosystem view of business technology.

In here, the authors emphasizes on the need to adapt traditional IT functions to the opportunities and challenges of emerging technologies that embraces business ecosystems. I fully support that sentiment.

In my eyes, some of the emerging technologies we see are in large misunderstood as something meant for being behind the corporate walls. My favorite example is the data lake concept. I do not think a data lake will be an often seen success solely within a single company as explained in the post Data Lakes in Business Ecosystems.

The raise of technology for business ecosystems will also affect the data management roles we know today. For example, a data steward will be a lot more focused towards external data than before as elaborated in the post The Future of Data Stewardship.

Encompassing business ecosystems in data management is of course a huge challenge we have to face while most enterprises still have not reached an acceptable maturity when it comes internal data and information governance. However, letting the outside in will also help in getting data and information right as told in the post Data Sharing Is The Answer To A Single Version Of The Truth.

biz-eco